Indian festival of Ganesh Chaturthi

This vibrant festival honors the birth of the beloved Hindu god, Lord Ganesha, popularly worshiped for his ability to remove obstacles and bring good fortune.

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Ganesh Chaturthi falls in late August or early September, depending on the cycle of the moon. In 2015, Ganesh Chaturthi is on September 17. It is celebrated for a few days with the biggest celebration taking place on the last day called Anant Chaturdasi day.
Mostly in the states of Maharashtra, Goa, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh. One of the best places to experience the festival is in the city of Mumbai. Celebrations take place in a special way at the towering Siddhivinayak temple, located in the central suburb of Prabhadevi, which is dedicated to Lord Ganesha.
An incalculable number of devotees visit the temple to join in prayers and pay their respects to the God during the festival. In addition, around 10,000 statues of Lord Ganesh are displayed at various locations in the city.
The festival begins with the installation of huge elaborately crafted statutes of Ganesha in homes and podiums, which have been especially constructed and beautifully decorated. Artisans put months of effort into making the idols.

On Ananta Chaturdasi (the last day), the statues or idols are paraded through the streets, accompanied by much singing and dancing, and then immersed in the ocean or other bodies of water.

Once a statue of Lord Ganesh is installed, a ceremony is undertaken to invoke his holy presence into the statue. This ritual is called the Pranapratishhtha Puja, during which a number of mantras are recited. Following this a special worship is performed. Offerings of sweets, flowers, rice, coconut, jaggery and coins are made to the God. The statue is also anointed with red chandan powder. Prayers are offered to Lord Ganesha every day during the festival. Temples devoted to Lord Ganesha also organize special events and prayers. Those who have a Ganesha statue in their house treat and care for him as a much loved guest.

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Hindus worship idols, or statues, of their gods because it gives them a visible form to pray to. They also recognize that the universe is in a constant state of change. Form eventually gives away to formlessness. However, the energy still remains. The immersion of the statues in the ocean, or other bodies of water, and subsequent destruction of them serves as a reminder of this belief.

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The festival is celebrated in a very public manner. Local communities compete with each other to put up the biggest and best Ganesha statue and display. Expect very crowded streets, filled with boisterous devotees, and lots of music.

It is my dearest wish to visit India during this auspicious time just to experience the energy and vibrance in the streets of India. The celebrations here in South Africa is celebrated on a much smaller scale by families at home and at temples.

Source: http://www.goindia.com

A video to enjoy of Ganesh Aarti.

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